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Archive for the 'Sam Barris' Category

 

George Barris – Kustomrama

Apr 11, 2010 in Barris Kustom, George Barris, Sam Barris

George Barris

Famous kustom builder, born in Chicago in 1925. George is the younger brother of Sam Barris. George was named after his uncle. After their parents died, Sam and George moved to Roseville, California in 1928 to live with relatives. Seven years old George began to build balsa wood models of cars and planes. By the time he was nine George was entering and winning model contests sponsored by local hobby shops.

via George Barris – Kustomrama.

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RETROSPECTIVE THE CUSTOMS OF SAM BARRIS

Feb 26, 2010 in Sam Barris

Sam Barris

Sam Barris

If you hear the name “Barris” , you’ll likely picture the wild Hollywood customs built by George Barris – cars like the original Batmobile, and Drag-u-la from the Munsters TV show. Although not as well known as his younger brother, Sam Barris made perhaps an even bigger contribution to the history of custom car building, pioneering the art of the chop top, among other things.

Barris Kustom Shop

Barris Kustom Shop

Sam shared his brother’s love for building cars, but was a bit more of the quiet type in comparison to George’s bold nature. Before the second world war, the two brothers customized a hand-me-down ’25 Buick that turned out to be the first of many Barris customs. After the war the Barris brothers reunited and came up with the idea of opening a a shop in Los Angeles. The Barris Kustom Shop was born.

1940 Mercury

1940 Mercury

One of Sam’s first personal projects was this 1940 Mercury that he built in the late ’40s. The car was shaved, chopped, and featured a removable Carson top.

removable Carson top

removable Carson top

While by today’s standards the car looks like a lot of traditional customs, you have to remember all this was done in the late 1940′s. I imagine was quite a sight to see the car on the streets of Los Angeles back then, as Sam used it as a daily driver.

1949 Merc

1949 Merc

After selling the ’40, Sam went and bought a brand new 1949 Mercury with the idea of making into a chopped custom. Chopping was a new thing at this time, so it took a lot of planning before the car was cut up. When completed, the car would be one of, if not the world’s first chopped Merc. With four inches removed from the top, the seats had to be bolted to the floor in order to give enough head room.

fadeaway rear fender

fadeaway rear fender

Besides the groundbreaking roof chop, the ’49 also had fadeaway rear fenders, molded front fenders, a custom front grill, one-off taillights, and side trim from a ’48 Buick. The car was coated in dark green, with a green and white interior.

last year's Grand National Roadster Show in Pomona

last year's Grand National Roadster Show in Pomona

After exchanging owners a few times, the Merc would eventually be fully restored to its original condition. It’s seen here at last year’s Grand National Roadster Show in Pomona.

Mercury, Bob Hirohata

Mercury, Bob Hirohata

After seeing Sam’s Mercury, Bob Hirohata was inspired to have a chopped Merc of his own. Sam did the chop on Hirohata’s ’51 hardtop, and both it and Sam’s ’49 helped make the ’49-’51 Mercury the quintessential custom.

1950 Buick

1950 Buick

Sam’s next project would be a 1950 Buick that took him nearly two years to finish. To give the fastback Buick a proper look, Sam sectioned the body to match the chop, and extended the rear fenders by four inches.

exotic production vehicle

exotic production vehicle

With all the work put into the car, it looked more like an exotic production vehicle rather than a garage-built custom. In fact, a lot of these customs would get more attention than the factory concept cars of the day.

52 Ford convertible

52 Ford convertible

One of Sam’s later projects was this ’52 Ford convertible that he used as a family car. Like his past cars, it featured lots of shaving, frenching, and a handmade front grill. In keeping with the “family” theme, the car also included a baby bottle warmer and diaper storage…

55 Chevy

55 Chevy

Following the Ford was another convertible, this one a ’55 Chevy. The ’55 was never known as a big custom platform, but if anyone could make it work, it was Sam Barris.

"El Capitola" '57 Chevy

Sam would eventually grow tired of the fast-paced LA life. In the late ’50s he moved back to Northern California, where he worked out of his own shop. The last collaboration between and George and Sam was the “El Capitola” ’57 Chevy, which debuted at the 1960 Sacramento Autorama.

Sam Barris would go on to work as fire commisioner in Northern California before he sadly passed away from cancer in 1967. Sam’s career as a customizer may have been short, his impact was as big as anyone.

It’ll be hard not to think about him the next time I see a chopped Merc at a car show…

-Mike Garrett

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Corky Coker and George Barris at the NHRA Exhibit

May 19, 2008 in 1949 Mercury custom, Barris Kustom, Honest Charley’s, NHRA Museum, Sam Barris

Here is a quote from our good friend Corky Coker’s blog:

At the opening of our exhibit at the NHRA Museum it all came together. Casey and Aaron did a great job building the exhibits for Coker Tire’s 50th and Honest Charley’s 60th Anniversaries. Everyone was really enjoying the opening of the displays. It was really something special to see all these pieces of our history on display. It was also my pleasure to spend some time with one of the car hobby’s most influential people, ever. And I mean EVER! The legendary George Barris was with us, as his famous 1949 Mercury Custom is proudly included in our exhibit. Barris’ custom Mercury is widely regarded as the most famous custom Mercury of all time, and by some as the father-car of all customs! George and I had a chance to do this little video blog during all the festivities. I hope you enjoy it.

There are some other videos of the exhibit and the famous Prolong Twilight Cruise Night at the NHRA museum in Pomona, CA. Check ‘em out

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